BECOMING ORTHODOX PETER GILLQUIST PDF

Start your review of Becoming Orthodox: A Journey to the Ancient Christian Faith Write a review Mar 03, Lisa Wuertz rated it really liked it I think this book does the best of all I have read of addressing the many issues Protestant converts and their families would face. Gillquist does it in a manner that is very down to earth and easy to read. I think this is also just a great book for Christians to read in general even if they are not remotely considering Orthodoxy. There is a lot to be gleaned from these pages. The book specifically addressed several things that have come up as walls for me, but was very brief and as such I think this book does the best of all I have read of addressing the many issues Protestant converts and their families would face.

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Start your review of Becoming Orthodox: A Journey to the Ancient Christian Faith Write a review Mar 03, Lisa Wuertz rated it really liked it I think this book does the best of all I have read of addressing the many issues Protestant converts and their families would face.

Gillquist does it in a manner that is very down to earth and easy to read. I think this is also just a great book for Christians to read in general even if they are not remotely considering Orthodoxy. There is a lot to be gleaned from these pages. The book specifically addressed several things that have come up as walls for me, but was very brief and as such I think this book does the best of all I have read of addressing the many issues Protestant converts and their families would face.

The book specifically addressed several things that have come up as walls for me, but was very brief and as such unfortunately silent about many other things. While I appreciate and like many things about the Orthodox church and now feel a greater understanding of my faith and the practice of that faith as it relates to church history and tradition, I am still not convinced about specifically cultural practices in the Orthodox church from music styles, to Byzantine chanting for reading scripture and praying, to interpersonal greetings and such.

I just find much of it very Eastern and not at all like Western culture or appealing to Western culture. One of the things I learned as a communications major about interpersonal communication, particularly when you are going to be communicating with those of another culture is you learn about them and adapt to their preference.

Everything from approximate personal space preference, to proper titles, forms of address, mannerisms, proper clothing, colors, expectations of gifts, etc is studied prior to communicating with those of another culture on a business level.

I think the Orthodox church is failing miserably in this even with the efforts of Gillquist and others involved in the AEOM. Our experience in Orthodox churches in the last few months has found them to be still very Eastern. We are not Eastern! I think if the Orthodox church wants to be more effective they need to stop trying to preserve the cultural identities of the jurisdictions like Antioch, Greece, Russia, etc.

I am not of Byzantine heritage, so why do I need to chant my prayers and scripture in the Byzantine style? Most American music is in the major scale and that is what we are used to, why at church do we need to submit to the harmonic minor scale in order for it to be proper worship to God? Some may argue then why not submit to them while I argue why should I.

Fr Guilquist and many other leaders of this movement started their Christian occupations in the s and s as activists for Campus Crusade for Christ. They travelled widely, trying to organise rallies at such universities as the uber-liberal Berkeley and Roman Catholic Notre Dame. Their focus was entirely on bringing young people to a personal relationship with Jesus Christ, not on building community, which they saw as denominationalism. Over time, however, they became jaded by their work, because many converts fell away after the initial dedication.

They understand the need for a Church which would provide lasting support. Yet, they had no idea what such a church should look like. In the early s these former CCC leaders came together to begin a study of what the Church looked like in the decades after Pentacost, using only the Bible and early Fathers, so that they might form a community mirroring it entirely.

They found that the early Church was liturgical, retaining a Judaic structure of worship after the expulsion from the synagogues, and that it was built around the Eucharist, which was seen as no mere commemoration but as a true mystery of faith. They discovered that the Church had a three-tiered division of authority, with bishops defending the faith, and priests and deacons serving the flocks of faithful.

In the end, they felt that the only place today that this ancient Church was continued and contained fully was the Orthodox Church. Over time, they discovered that many of the exotic qualities of Orthodox Christianity, such as veneration of Mary and icons, and the liturgical use of incense, were entirely in keeping with the Gospel that gave them strength.

However, they had no personal experience with the Orthodox Church, which in the North America of the time was still seen as an ethnic conclave, in spite of a steady stream on individual conversions. They attended various offerings at Orthodox churches, met with Orthodox apologists such as the famed Fr Alexander Schmemann, and tried themselves to follow Orthodox traditions in their own worship.

For a long time they were unsure of how to enter the Church which seemed to fulfill the discoveries of their investigations, and the division of Orthodoxy in North America along numerous ethnic lines was a sad complication. The Greek Orthodox Church was disapproving of their entering the Church, afraid that so many Americans would "dilute Greek traditions", a shameful blot of nationalism on the Church.

Their attempt to meet the Patriarch of Constantinople for guidance was shrugged off. In the end, many of them were losing hope that Orthodoxy could provide a lasting home for them.

Then, the Metropolitan of the Antiochian Orthodox Church in America invited them to enter under his guidance, and wished that they would all come in within only a few months. The book ends with a recounting of the mass charismations and ordinations which brought these travellers home after a journey of over a decade. A new afterword written in talks about the victories made by these converts and their fellow Orthodox in the years since.

Theological arguments are not very deep, but friendly to Evangelical Protestants without much formal training. I am reluctant to criticise a work of such admirable zeal and which is so spiritually uplifting. I wish, however, that the book could have enjoyed some tighter editing and academic typesetting.

There is a profusion of exclamation points and italics, and the formatting of the text is not up to professional standards. As it is, the work looks unfortunately amateurish. The earliest traditions have continued for two thousand years through the Orthodox church. If you are curious about it, here is the book for you.

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Becoming Orthodox: A Journey to the Ancient Christian Faith (2010 EDITION)

He attended the University of Minnesota where he received a B. While at university he became involved with the Campus Crusade for Christ evangelistic organization and became a born-again Christian. After several years with Campus Crusade, Gillquist worked for three years at the University of Memphis , then for 11 years with Thomas Nelson Publishing in Nashville , where he eventually became a senior editor. Spiritual journey[ edit ] The body of Archpriest Peter E. Researching the historical basis of the Christian faith, Gillquist and his colleagues found sources for this restoration in the writings of the early Church Fathers. This led the group to practice a more liturgical form of worship than in their previous evangelical background. Gillquist and other EOC leaders traveled to Istanbul to meet with Patriarch Demetrios I of Constantinople but were unable to complete any substantial progress toward their goal.

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Becoming Orthodox

He attended the University of Minnesota where he received a B. While at university he became involved with the Campus Crusade for Christ evangelistic organization and became a born-again Christian. After several years with Campus Crusade, Gillquist worked for three years at the University of Memphis , then for 11 years with Thomas Nelson Publishing in Nashville , where he eventually became a senior editor. Spiritual journey While still on staff at Campus Crusade, Gillquist and some of his colleagues began studying church history and came to the conclusion that the Orthodox Church was the only unchanged church in history. Researching the historical basis of the Christian faith, Gillquist and his colleagues found sources for this restoration in the writings of the early Church Fathers. This led the group to practice a more liturgical form of worship than in their previous evangelical background.

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