IDA TARBELL THE HISTORY OF THE STANDARD OIL COMPANY PDF

Shelves: female-author-count , history-american , biz-economics-law , ohioans Ida Tarbell slowly and deliberately tears Rockefeller and his buds new ones with this extremely careful study of exactly what was done by Standard Oil and what that meant for everyone else. This blow-by-blow gives in painful detail and this is the abridged version! The lesson for the present day is, for ostrich like US consumers, stop Ida Tarbell slowly and deliberately tears Rockefeller and his buds new ones with this extremely careful study of exactly what was done by Standard Oil and what that meant for everyone else. Her relentless efforts to expose "Trusts" and "Monopolies" caused Americans to take note of the activities of John D.

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Ida M. Tarbell, ca. Science was a field largely closed to women, however, and she instead pursued teaching, a profession deemed more suitable for a woman. In she met Dr. Thomas Flood, editor of the Chautauquan, a magazine published in nearby Meadville, Pennsylvania. Flood was about to retire his position and he asked Tarbell to assist him for a few months while he searched for a successor. She accepted and ended up working at the Chautauquan as a writer and editor for six years. IdaTarbell, ca.

In , Tarbell moved to Paris. She had written a series of articles about women of the French Revolution and she went to France to research a projected biography of one of those women, Madame Marie-Jeanne Roland.

Her work was a sensation and the installments became a two-volume book entitled, The History of the Standard Oil Company, published in Tarbell meticulously documented the aggressive techniques Standard Oil employed to outmaneuver and, where necessary, roll over whoever got in its way. Tarbell actually objected to the term, for she felt it belittled work she believed to be of historical importance. The Court found that Standard was an illegal monopoly and ordered it broken into 34 separate companies.

Bloodied, Rockefeller and Standard were hardly defeated. Rockefeller maintained huge holdings in all 34 companies and the breakup actually proved enormously profitable. Retiring to Easton In , not long after her rise to fame, Tarbell purchased a home in Easton , Connecticut. Easton was a farming town and she used the home and its acre spread as a country getaway for the next 18 years while living primarily in New York City. She lectured widely and continued writing for important publications of the time, like the American Magazine, of which she was also co-editor.

Among the events she covered were the negotiations in Versailles at the conclusion of World War One. In , Tarbell moved permanently to Easton. She took ill with pneumonia in December and died in Bridgeport Hospital on January 6, , at age The house she lived in in Easton became a National Historic Landmark in Bridgeport native Andy Piascik is an award-winning author who has written for many publications and websites over the last four decades.

He is also the author of two books. Learn More Tarbell, Ida M. Brady, Kathleen. Ida Tarbell: Portrait of a Muckraker. Tarbell, Ida M. The History of the Standard Oil Company.

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Ida M. Tarbell, ca. Science was a field largely closed to women, however, and she instead pursued teaching, a profession deemed more suitable for a woman. In she met Dr. Thomas Flood, editor of the Chautauquan, a magazine published in nearby Meadville, Pennsylvania. Flood was about to retire his position and he asked Tarbell to assist him for a few months while he searched for a successor. She accepted and ended up working at the Chautauquan as a writer and editor for six years.

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Ida M. Tarbell, “The History of the Standard Oil Company,” 1904.

John D. Period Ida M. Tarbell, c. Photo: Wikipedia At the age of 14, Ida Tarbell witnessed the Cleveland Massacre , in which dozens of small oil producers in Ohio and Western Pennsylvania, including her father, were faced with a daunting choice that seemed to come out of nowhere: sell their businesses to the shrewd, confident 32 year-old John D. Rockefeller, Sr.

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